‘Testator Intent’ In Wills, Estates And Trusts Law

When it comes to wills, estate and trust law, testator estate generally rules the day.

“Testator intent” refers to the desires and goals of the person who wrote the will, trust-creation document or other important legal matter. We have laws meant to ensure a reasonably degree of clarity, of course, but when there is a dispute (as there so often is), courts try hard to understand and honor the testator’s wishes.

What brings this all to mind is a recent story we read about a 98-year-old woman died and left all of her considerable fortune to her window cleaner, rather than the adult nephew who cared for her during her old age.

The woman had previous wills drafted that left her estate to her “favorite nephew,” but by the time she died in 2008, she had changed her estate plan to leave almost everything to the window cleaner.

The nephew has now sued, alleging that his aunt lacked capacity to execute her final will and, if she did have capacity, was subject to “undue influence” from the window cleaner.

This lawsuit has just started, so we have no idea how it will turn out. However, we can anticipate that the court will try its best to figure out what the aunt wanted.

The reason we’re sharing this story with our Houston audience is that it seems to provide a good example of a crucial element of wills, estates and trusts law. If you think you need to further your understanding of this legal realm, please feel free to contact us.